Met_Art_museum_M.jpgPaper Clip Art.jpgColored Paper Clip Art .jpg
Paper Clip Art by Allen, circa 2010... : )


Fra Luca Pacioli (Italian, d. ca. 1514), based on Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, Vinci 1452–1519 Clos-Lucé).

Page from //Divina proportione//, (Definitely click on the "additional images", to view his entire alphabet

of exquisite Geometry!) June 1, 1509. Published by Paganinus de Paganinus, Venice. Book with woodcut illustrations;

Overall: 11 5/8 x 8 1/4 x 1 1/4 in. (29.6 x 21 x 3.1 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 1919 (19.50).


This image is a reproduction of a Book Illustration from about 500 years ago!

and the letters are carved shapes cut into a piece of wood using very sharp cutting tools. Something to think about:

How did Fra Luca Paciola carve the block of wood? Is the letter "M" carved-out of the surface ('incised' like a Surgeon's "incision")

OR is the letter "M" all that remains "untouched" by his knife/ carving tools...and it is All The Background shapes and space that is Carved Away...?

Think about the liquid black ink that is pressed on the page...

That may lead to the answer... I gotta do more "fact-finding" about Woodcut Illustrations... :-)

BTW: How do you carve Perfect Circles in a block of wood...? I guess very carefully...


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Update August 2016: Fantastic: "The Little Prince" Book & Gumby animated film PBL

http://www.gumbyworld.com/blog/2780/the-little-prince-and-gumby-unique-connections/

Read the Book, See the Film! Share... Thanks...

Current Exhibition in Seattle at Museum of history & Industry

http://www.mohai.org/exhibits/item/2723-toys-of-the-50s-60s-70s


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2. http://www.graphis.com

One of the best graphic arts magazines in the world. I grew-up on visiting libraries that subscribed to this very expensive magazine because even Before Computers (B.C.) they published the world's best (or best of the "commercially recognized") graphic artists,

and the art and advertising and design companies/studios that hired them. This is The Grand-Daddy Magazine of Commercial Graphic Art and they still are going strong...as you can view on their website...

Here is a current (2011?) illustration from their website, listed in "Portfolios", by Matt W. Moore.


Graphis_magazine.jpg


3. http://www.behance.net/

This website is a worldwide network for Design and Advertising Professionals... way cool...

4. https://www.flickr.com/photos/taffeta/

Now this is one enormous online paper-collection (by a French woman) who has 40,000+ photos of

antique paper French 'ephemera' (I think that is the correct word ...?) including old cards, magazines,

children's books, posters, on and on and on...


5. There is an ongoing debate about the difference between a Graphic Artist and a Graphic Designer, especially with the emergence of personal computers and artistic software programs. I'll let you figure out the linguistic and career 'overlaps and confusions'... if you want to...


6. Regardless of the debate, here is a link to a Google Image Search for "Graphic Art"... that will keep you busy for a while...

6A. and Google Doodles are examples of Graphic Art and Design Animations based on their homepage logo.


7. And here are the links to two major Arts and Design Colleges, that can help you understand the many education and career options available:

The California College for the Arts (in San Francisco)

The Parsons New School for Design (in New York City)


8. Update August 2016: Fantastic: "The Little Prince" Book & Gumby animated film PBL

http://www.gumbyworld.com/blog/2780/the-little-prince-and-gumby-unique-connections/

Read the Book, See the Film! Share... Thanks...