Sports Courts and Fields are Pure Geometry

and textures, surfaces, physics, weather conditions (if outdoors), materials, spectator architecture seating arrangements, acoustics, lighting, entrances and exits, parking and public transportation planning and design, expenditures and income analysis, seasons and schedules of games, facilities management, security systems and personnel, logistics management, media and publicity 'arrangements', players and associations contracts, ...tell me when to stop...

1. Geometry of a Professional Basketball Court

where hundreds of millions of dollars are "leveraged"... every year...

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1.1. Basketball Court with Further Geometry Measurements and Colored Graphics



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Obviously a CAD Engineer produced this Diagram for your consideration...

and now you know why they call it "In the Paint" and why that is such a critical area of the Court Design and Basketball Strategy...

and when I was a kid playing hoops (back in the 1950s and 60s...) there was NO 3-Point Range and NO 3-Point Shots; every basket was 2 points, except of course Foul Shots from the Free Throw Line, which were 1 point each.

The Owners Group and the Media Moguls decided that the Game needed some additional Excitement to expand the players "prowess and skills" and liven up the competition and viewers' experience of the sport...


The three point line was introduced because people believed a shot made at a far distance should be worth more points than a layup. Thus, the 3 point line was introduced. The 3 point shot was introduced by the upstart ABL in 1961 (the league only survived a couple of years) and was brought back by the ABA in 1971 (along with the 30 second shot clock and the dunk) and adopted by the NBA after they merged in 1979-80. The NCAA allowed the Southeast Conference to experiment with 3-pointers in 1980-81 and the rest of the College Conferences followed suit within the next two seasons Read more: